Verwendete Quellen

 

 

12 data sources were used to construct the Corruption Perceptions Index 2015:


1.    African Development Bank Governance Ratings 2014
2.    Bertelsmann Foundation Sustainable Governance Indicators 2015
3.    Bertelsmann Foundation Transformation Index 2016
4.    Economist Intelligence Unit Country Risk Ratings 2015
5.    Freedom House Nations in Transit 2015
6.    Global Insight Country Risk Ratings 2014
7.    IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook 2015
8.    Political and Economic Risk Consultancy Asian Intelligence 2015
9.    Political Risk Services International Country Risk Guide 2015
10.    World Bank - Country Policy and Institutional Assessment 2014
11.    World Economic Forum Executive Opinion Survey (EOS) 2015
12.    World Justice Project Rule of Law Index 2015
 

Verwendete Quellen pro Land im Überblick (Tabelle)

 

1. African Development Bank Governance Ratings 2014

Code: AFDB

Data Provider


The African Development Bank (AFDB) is a regional multilateral development bank, engaged in promoting the economic development and social progress of countries on the continent.

The AfDB’s 2014 Governance Ratings are part of the Country Policy and Institutional Assessment (CPIA), which assesses the quality of a country’s institutional framework in terms of how conducive it is to fostering the effective use of development assistance. The current CPIA strives to achieve a maximum level of uniformity and consistency across all regional member countries surveyed. Also, and in order to comply with the Paris and Rome declarations on Aid Effectiveness, Harmonization and Alignment, the AfDB has modified the questionnaire and guidelines for its CPIA to be in line with those of the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank, thus increasing the comparability and synergy among systems.

The CPIA is carried out by a group of country economists with vast experience in policy analysis. The knowledge of these experts is complemented with that of local contacts that provide both quantitative and qualitative insights. Peer discussions are also used to monitor the quality of the findings.

Corruption Question(s)

Experts are asked to assess:

Transparency, Accountability and Corruption in the Public Sector.

“This criterion assesses the extent to which the executive can be held accountable for its use of funds and the results of its actions by the electorate and by the legislature and judiciary, and the extent to which public employees within the executive are required to account for the use of resources, administrative decisions, and results obtained. Both levels of accountability are enhanced by transparency in decision making, public audit institutions, access to relevant and timely information, and public and media scrutiny. A high degree of accountability and transparency discourages corruption, or the abuse of public office for private gain. National and sub-national governments should be appropriately weighted.
Each of three dimensions should be rated separately:
(a) the accountability of the executive to oversight institutions and of public employees for their performance;
(b) access of civil society to information on public affairs; and
(c) state capture by narrow vested interests.”

The questionnaire for CPIA assessment can be accessed here: https://cpia.afdb.org/documents/public/cpia2014-questionnaire-en.pdf

Scores

The rating scale ranges from 1 (very weak for two or more years) to 6 (very strong for three or more years) and allows for half point intermediate scores (e.g.3.5).
The score is an aggregate of the three dimensions of corruption across national and sub-national government institutions in the country.

Country Coverage


40 African countries are covered.

Countries are scored in terms of their performance during the year of the rating vis-à-vis the criteria, which are included in the CPIA Manual for Drafters and updated every year. The CPIA is a three-phase process involving i) the rating of countries by country teams; iii) the review of all ratings by sector experts; and iii) the endorsement of final ratings at open discussions between country teams and reviewers

Data availability

The data set has been published annually since 2005.
The 2014 Governance Ratings were compiled during 2014 and published in March 2015.
The data is publicly available online in the Bank’s web page,
https://cpia.afdb.org/?page=data  

 

 

2. Bertelsmann Foundation Sustainable Governance Indicators 2015

Code: BF (SGI)

Data Provider

The Bertelsmann Stiftung was founded in 1977 as a private foundation. As a think tank they work toward improved education, a just and efficient economic system, a preventative healthcare system, a vibrant civil society and greater international understanding. The Bertelsmann Stiftung is independent and nonpartisan. It designs, launches and runs its own projects.

The  Sustainable Governance Indicators (SGI) examine governance and policymaking in all OECD and EU member states in order to evaluate each country's need for, and ability to carry out, reform.

The indicators are calculated using quantitative data from international organisations and then supplemented by qualitative assessments from recognised country experts.

Corruption Question(s)

Experts are asked to assess:

“To what extent are public officeholders prevented from abusing their position for private interests?”
This question addresses how the state and society prevent public servants and politicians from accepting bribes by applying mechanisms to guarantee the integrity of officeholders: auditing of state spending; regulation of party financing; citizen and media access to information; accountability of officeholders (asset declarations, conflict of interest rules, codes of conduct); transparent public procurement systems; effective prosecution of corruption.

Scores are given from:

  • a low of 1 to 2, where 'Public officeholders can exploit their offices for private gain as they see fit without fear of legal consequences or adverse publicity'
  • to a high of 9 to 10, where 'Legal, political and public integrity mechanisms effectively prevent public officeholders from abusing their positions.'


Scores

Scores are given on a scale of 1 (highest level of corruption) to 10 (lowest level of corruption).

Country Coverage

All 41 OECD and EU countries were scored.

The quantitative data are compiled centrally by the SGI project team from official, publicly accessible statistics (primarily from OECD sources). The qualitative data are captured and examined by a worldwide network of around 100 respected researchers. The SGI Codebook, a detailed questionnaire, provides a clear explanation for each of the questions, so that all experts share a common understanding of the questions (http://www.sgi-network.org/docs/2015/basics/SGI2015_Codebook.pdf).

Data availability

First published in 2009, this is now a biennial publication.

The Sustainable Governance Indicators 2015 were published in late 2015, and data is publicly available online. It assesses a two-year period from 15 May 2013 to 7 November 2015.

http://www.sgi-network.org/2015/Democracy/Quality_of_Democracy/Rule_of_Law/Corruption_Prevention  

 

 

3. Bertelsmann Foundation Transformation Index 2015

Code: BF (TI)

Data Provider


The Bertelsmann Stiftung was founded in 1977 as a private foundation. As a think tank they work toward improved education, a just and efficient economic system, a preventative healthcare system, a vibrant civil society and greater international understanding. The Bertelsmann Stiftung is independent and nonpartisan. It designs, launches and runs its own projects.

The Transformation Index provides the framework for an exchange of good practice among agents of reform. Within this framework, the BTI publishes two rankings, the Status Index and the Management Index, both of which are based on in-depth assessments of 129 countries. The scores are based on detailed country reports which assess 52 questions divided into 17 criteria.  

Assessments are provided by two experts per country. Country assessments consist of two sections: the written assessment of the state of transformation and management performance in a country (country report) and the numerical assessment of the state of transformation and management performance (country ratings). Scores are given by a country expert, which are then reviewed blind by a second country expert who also provides a second independent rating of the country. These scores by experts are then verified and discussed by regional coordinators to ensure intra and inter-regional comparability in ratings. In addition, BF has also instituted an extra layer of verification to ensure the scores provided match the qualitative descriptions for each country.

Corruption Question(s)

Experts are asked to assess:

“To what extent are public officeholders who abuse their positions prosecuted or penalized?”
Assessments range from:

  • a low of 1, where 'Officeholders who break the law and engage in corruption can do so without fear of legal consequences or adverse publicity.'
  • to a high of 10, where 'Officeholders who break the law and engage in corruption are prosecuted rigorously under established laws and always attract adverse publicity.'


“To what extent does the government successfully contain corruption?” Assessments range from:

  • from a low of 1, where 'The government fails to contain corruption, and there are no integrity mechanisms in place.'
  • to a high of 10, where 'The government is successful in containing corruption, and all integrity mechanisms are in place and effective.'


Scores

Scores are assigned on a scale of 1-10 with 10 being the lowest level of corruption and 1 being the highest.

The score for each country is an average of the two questions.
The BTI codebook for 2014 is accessible here: http://www.bti-project.org/uploads/tx_itao_download/BTI2014_Codebook_01.pdf

Country Coverage

129 countries and territories are scored.

Country scores pass through an intra-regional review stage followed by an inter-regional review and ratings aggregation.

Data availability

The Transformation Index was first published in 2003, and has been published every two years since then.

The data is taken from the BTI 2015 report, which will be published in February 2016, and data will be publicly available online after its publication. It assesses a two-year period from 1 February 2013 to 31 January 2015.

http://www.bti-project.org/index/
 

 

4. Economist Intelligence Unit Country Risk Ratings

Code: EIU

Data Provider


The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) was established in 1946 as the research body for The Economist newspaper. Since then, it has grown into a global research and advisory firm that produces business intelligence for policy makers worldwide. 650 full-time and contributing analysts work in and on over 200 countries/territories.

Country Risk Ratings are designed to provide in-depth and timely analysis of the risks of financial exposure in more than 140 countries.

The EIU relies on teams of experts based primarily in London (but also in New York, Hong Kong, Beijing and Shanghai) who are supported by a global network of in-country specialists. Each country analyst covers a maximum of two or three countries/territories. The economic and political reports produced by EIU analysts are subjected to a rigorous review process before publication.

Corruption Question(s)

Specific guiding questions include:

  • Are there clear procedures and accountability governing the allocation and use of public funds?
  • Are public funds misappropriated by ministers/public officials for private or party political purposes?
  • Are there special funds for which there is no accountability?
  • Are there general abuses of public resources?
  • Is there a professional civil service or are large numbers of officials directly appointed by the government?
  • Is there an independent body auditing the management of public finances?
  • Is there an independent judiciary with the power to try ministers/public officials for abuses?
  • Is there a tradition of a payment of bribes to secure contracts and gain favours?


Scores

Scores are given as integers on a scale from 0 (very low incidence of corruption) to 4 (very high incidence of corruption).

Country Coverage

128 countries/territories were scored in 2015.

Data availability

Country risk assessments have been produced by the EIU since the early 1980s. Updated summaries are provided monthly for 100 countries and quarterly for the rest.

The CPI draws on risk rating data available as of August 2015.

Data is available to subscribers of EIU Country Risk Service.

http://www.eiu.com
 

 

5. Freedom House Nations in Transit 2015

Code: FH

Data Provider


Founded in 1941, Freedom House is an independent watchdog organisation that supports the expansion of freedom around the world. Freedom House supports democratic change, monitors freedom, and advocates for democracy and human rights.

The Nations in Transit (NIT) reports measure democratisation in 29 nations and administrative areas throughout Central Europe and the Newly Independent States (NIS). The reports focus on democratic progress and setbacks. Each report focuses on the following thematic areas: national democratic governance; electoral process; civil society; independent media; local democratic governance; judicial framework and independence; and corruption.

The NIT surveys were produced by Freedom House staff and consultants. The latter were recommended by relevant authorities and are regional or country specialists. A range of sources were used in compiling the report, including: multilateral lending institutions; non-governmental organisations; and other international organisations; local newspapers and magazines; and select government data.

Corruption Question(s)

The Freedom House experts are asked to explore a range of indicative questions, including:

  • Has the government implemented effective anti-corruption initiatives?
  • Is the government free from excessive bureaucratic regulations, registration requirements, and other controls that increase opportunities for corruption?
  • Are there adequate laws requiring financial disclosure and disallowing conflict of interest?
  • Does the government advertise jobs and contracts?
  • Does the state enforce an effective legislative or administrative process—particularly one that is free of prejudice against one’s political opponents—to prevent, investigate, and prosecute the corruption of government officials and civil servants?
  • Do whistleblowers, anti-corruption activists, investigators, and journalists enjoy legal protections that make them feel secure about reporting cases of bribery and corruption?


Scores

Ratings run from 1 (lowest level of corruption) to 7 (highest level of corruption) and allow for half-point and quarter-point intermediate scores (e.g. 3.25).

The score is a generalised composite measure of corruption that includes an assessment of all areas covered by the indicative questions.

Country Coverage


29 countries/territories were ranked in 2015.

Country scores are reviewed at the regional level and then centrally by the Freedom House academic advisory board.

Data availability

The report has been published annually since 2003.

The 2015 Nations in Transit data coverage is from 1 January through 31 December 2014.

The data is publicly available online.

https://freedomhouse.org/report/nations-transit/nations-transit-2015
 

 

6. Global Insight Country Risk Ratings  

Code: GI

Data Provider


Founded in 1959, IHS is a global information company employing more than 5,100 people in more than 30 countries around the world. It provides a wide range of online services covering macroeconomics, country risk and individual sector analysis.

The Global Insight country risk rating system has been in operation since 1999 and provides a six-factor analysis of the risk environment in 203 countries/territories. The six factors are political, economic, legal, tax operational and security risk. The corruption risk score used in the CPI is drawn largely from the evaluation of operational risk, but also builds on the insight of the country experts in analysing the other areas of risk.  

The assessments are made by over 100 in-house country specialists, who also draw on the expert opinions of in-country freelancers, clients and other contacts. The ratings reflect IHS Global Insights expert perceptions of the comparative level of the problem in each country/territory. The ratings assess the broad range of corruption, from petty bribe-paying to higher-level political corruption and the scores assigned to each country are based on a qualitative assessment of corruption in each country/territory.

Corruption Question(s)

Experts are asked to assess:

Corruption, particularly as it affects operational activities for businesses. There is analytical emphasis on the economic and political drivers of the problem.

From a business perspective, corruption is a particular concern in relation to obtaining business permits and favourable policy and planning decisions. Analysts will closely assess businesses’ experience of these processes.

Scores

The ratings range from a minimum of 1.0 (minimum corruption) to 5.0 (maximum corruption) and allow for half-point intermediate scores (e.g. 3.5).

Country Coverage

203 countries/territories worldwide are scored.

Scores provided by country analysts are reviewed and benchmarked by IHS Global Insight's risk specialists at both the regional and global level.

Data availability

The Country Risk Rating System has been available since 1999 and is continuously maintained.

The data for CPI 2015 is based on GI scores from Aug 2014. The CPI 2015 is relying on GI scores from 2014 due to IHS Global Insight ceasing supply of latest risk ratings data to Transparency International.

Data is available to customers of IHS’ Country Intelligence.

http://www.ihs.com/products/global-insight/country-analysis/
 

 

7. IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook 2015  

Code: IMD

Data Provider


IMD is a top-ranked business school with expertise in developing global leaders through high-impact executive education. 100% focused on real-world executive development, offering Swiss excellence with a global perspective, IMD has a flexible, customized and effective approach.

IMD is ranked first in open programs worldwide (Financial Times 2012 & 2013) and first in executive education outside the US (Financial Times 2008 - 2013).
(www.imd.org)

The World Competitiveness Yearbook (WCY) measures the competitiveness of nations and, in doing so, both ranks and examines how a nation’s socio-political and economic climate affects corporate competitiveness. The study uses 333 criteria in order to obtain a multifaceted image of the competitiveness of nations, defined as following: “Competitiveness of nations is a field of economic knowledge, which analyses the facts and policies that shape the ability of a nation to create and maintain an environment that sustains more value creation for its enterprises and more prosperity for its people.”

The WCY largely includes hard data but also a survey of senior business leaders who, together, reflect a cross-section of a nation’s corporate community. IMD calls upon local and foreign enterprises operating in a given economy, and surveys both nationals and expatriates, so as to add an international perspective on local environments. In 2015 4,300 business executives responded. The IMD World Competitiveness Centre works in collaboration with 54 partner institutes around the world to assure the validity and relevance of data.

http://www.imd.org/uupload/imd.website/wcc/methodology.pdf?MRK_CMPG_SOURCE=
http://www.imd.org/uupload/imd.website/wcc/Survey_Explanation.pdf?MRK_CMPG_SOURCE=

Corruption Question

Survey respondents were asked:

“Bribing and corruption: Exist or do not exist”.

Scores

Answers are given on a 1 - 6 scale which is then converted to a 0 - 10 scale where 0 is the highest level of perceived corruption and 10 is the lowest.  

Country Coverage

61 countries/territories around the world were scored in 2015.

Data availability

The IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook has been published annually since 1989.

The 2015 data were published on the 27th May 2015.

Data is available to customers of IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook, package or online services.

http://www.imd.org/wcc

 

8. Political and Economic Risk Consultancy 2014

Code: PERC

Data Provider


The Political and Economic Risk Consultancy or PERC is a consulting firm specialising in strategic business information and analysis for companies doing business in the countries of East and Southeast Asia. As part of its services, PERC produces a range of risk reports on Asian countries, paying special attention to critical socio-political variables like corruption, intellectual property rights and risks, labour quality, and other systemic strengths and weakness of individual Asian countries/territories.

PERC publishes fortnightly newsletters, which are available to subscribers, on a number of issues. The data for the CPI was gathered from the corruption newsletter, which gathers and interprets data from an executive opinion survey of local and expatriate businesspeople.

All responses were either collected in face-to-face interviews or in response to e-mails directed to specific people obtained from different national business chambers, conferences, and personal name lists. All respondents provided scores and comments only for the country in which they are currently residing. Respondents for each country include local business executives who are nationals of the countries, academics and expatriate executives.

Corruption Question(s)


The following three questions were asked:

First, how do you grade the problem of corruption in the country in which you are working? Second, has corruption decreased, stayed the same or increased compared with one year ago? Third, what aspects or implications of corruption in your country stand out to you as being particularly important?

For the CPI only the first question: how do you grade the problem of corruption in the country in which you are working was used.

Scores

Answers to the question were scaled from 0 (not a problem) to 10 (a serious problem).

Country Coverage

15 Asian countries/territories plus the Unites States were surveyed in 2014.

The same questions and survey methodology were employed in each country surveyed.

Data availability

The survey dates back 20 years and is conducted annually.

The data used for the CPI 2015 was gathered in a survey carried out between January 2015 and March 2015 and published in April 2015.

The data is available to subscribers.

http://www.asiarisk.com/
 

 

9. Political Risk Services International Country Risk Guide

Code: PRS

Data Provider


Based in the vicinity of Syracuse, New York, since its founding in 1979, Political Risk Services (PRS) has consistently focused on political risk analysis.

On a monthly basis since 1980, their International Country Risk Guide (ICRG) has produced political, economic, and financial risk ratings for countries/territories important to international business. The ICRG now monitors 140 countries/territories. ICRG ratings form the basis of an early warning system for opportunities and pitfalls, country-by-country.

ICRG staff collect political information and convert it to risk points on the basis of a consistent pattern of evaluation. Political risk assessments and other political information form the basis of ICRG risk ratings. It is therefore possible for the user to check through the information and data so as to assess the ratings against their own assessments, or against some other risk ratings system.

Corruption Question(s)

This is an assessment of corruption within the political system. The most common form of corruption met directly by businesses is financial corruption in the form of demands for special payments and bribes connected with import and export licenses, exchange controls, tax assessments, police protection, or loans. The measure is most concerned with actual or potential corruption in the form of excessive patronage, nepotism, job reservations, exchange of favours, secret party funding, and suspiciously close ties between politics and business.

Scores

The corruption scores are given on a scale of 0 (highest potential risk) to 6 (lowest potential risk).

Country Coverage

The ICRG provides ratings for 140 countries on a monthly basis.

To ensure consistency both between countries/territories and over time, points are assigned by ICRG editors on the basis of a series of pre-set questions for each risk component.

Data availability

The ICRG model was created in 1980 and the data is made available on a monthly basis.

The CPI 2015 data is an aggregate of quarterly assessments covering the period of August 2014 to August 2015.

Data is available to customers of the PRS International Country Risk Guide.

www.prsgroup.com
 

 

10. World Bank Country Policy and Institutional Assessment 2014

Code: WB

Data Provider


The World Bank was established in 1944, is headquartered in Washington, D.C and has more than 10,000 employees in more than 100 offices worldwide. The World Bank is made up of two development institutions: the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and the International Development Association (IDA).The IBRD aims to reduce poverty in middle-income and creditworthy poorer countries, while IDA focuses on the world's poorest countries.

The CPIA rates all IDA-eligible countries against a set of 16 criteria grouped in four clusters: (a) economic management; (b) structural policies; (c) policies for social inclusion and equity; and (d) public sector management and institutions. The criteria are focused on balancing the capture of those factors critical to fostering growth and poverty reduction against avoiding undue burden on the assessment process.

The ratings are the product of staff judgment and do not necessarily reflect the views of the World Bank’s Board of Executive Directors or the governments they represent. The Bank has prepared guidance to help staff assess country performance, by providing a definition of each criterion and a detailed description of each rating level. Bank staff assess the countries’ actual performance on each of the criteria, and assign a rating. The ratings reflect a variety of indicators, observations, and judgments based on country knowledge, originating with the Bank or elsewhere, and on relevant publicly available indicators.

Corruption Question(s)

Experts are asked to assess:

Transparency, Accountability and Corruption in the Public Sector.
“This criterion assesses the extent to which the executive can be held accountable for its use of funds and the results of its actions by the electorate and by the legislature and judiciary, and the extent to which public employees within the executive are required to account for the use of resources, administrative decisions, and results obtained. Both levels of accountability are enhanced by transparency in decision making, public audit institutions, access to relevant and timely information, and public and media scrutiny. A high degree of accountability and transparency discourages corruption, or the abuse of public office for private gain. National and sub-national governments should be appropriately weighted.
Each of three dimensions should be rated separately:
(a) accountability of the executive to oversight institutions and of public employees for their performance;
(b) access of civil society to information on public affairs; and
(c) state capture by narrow vested interests.”

http://pubdocs.worldbank.org/pubdocs/publicdoc/2015/6/559351435159340828/cpia14-webFAQ14.pdf

Scores

The rating scale ranges from 1 (low levels of transparency) to 6 (high levels of transparency) and allows for half-point intermediate scores (eg. 3.5). The score is an aggregate of the three dimensions of corruption across national and sub-national government institutions in the country/territory.

Country Coverage

76 countries were scored in the CPIA 2015.
The process of preparing the ratings involves two phases: (a) the benchmarking phase, in which a small, representative, sample of countries is rated in an intensive Bank-wide process; and (b) a second phase, in which the remaining countries are rated using the derived benchmark ratings as guideposts. The process is managed by the Bank’s Operations Policy and Country Services Vice-Presidency.

Data availability

First released in 2005 in its current form, the CPIA is now an annual exercise.
The ratings process typically starts in the fall and is concluded in the spring of the following year. The scores disclosed in June 2015 (the 2014 CPIA exercise) cover 2014 country performance.
The data is publicly available online.
http://data.worldbank.org/data-catalog/CPIA  

 

 

11. World Economic Forum Executive Opinion Survey (EOS) 2015

Code: WEF

Data Provider


The World Economic Forum is an independent international organisation committed to improving the state of the world by engaging business, political, academic and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. Incorporated as a not-for-profit foundation in 1971, and headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, the Forum is not tied to political, partisan or national interests.

The Executive Opinion Survey (EOS) is the World Economic Forum's annual survey of business executives. The survey has evolved over time to capture new data points essential to the Global Competitiveness Index (GCI) and other Forum indexes.

The Forum's Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Network works closely with a network of over 160 Partner Institutes that administer the survey in their respective countries/territories. They are selected because of their capacity to reach out to leading business executives as well as their understanding of the national business environment and their commitment to the Forum's research on competitiveness. The Partner Institutes are, for the most part, well-respected economics departments of national universities, independent research institutes or business organisations. An average of 94.7 business executives per country/territory were surveyed for the EOS 2013. The surveys are conducted according to detailed guidelines aiming at collecting a sample stratified by sector of activity and company size. The EOS administration process is reviewed on a yearly basis and underwent an external review in 2008 and 2012 by a renowned survey expert consultancy.  See chapter 1.3 of the Global Competitiveness Report 2013-2014 for further details www.weforum.org/gcr.

Corruption Question(s)

Survey respondents were asked:

(On a scale of 1 - 7 where 1 means very common and 7 means never)
“In your country, how common is it for firms to make undocumented extra payments or bribes connected with the following”:
a) Imports and exports;
b) Public Utilities;
c) Annual Tax Payments;
d) Awarding of public contracts and licenses;
e) Obtaining favourable judicial decisions.

(on a scale of 1 - 7 where 1 means very common and 7 means never)
“In your country, how common is diversion of public funds to companies, individuals or groups due to corruption?”

(on a scale of 1 - 7 where 1 means very common and 7 means never)
In your country, how do you rate the corporate ethics of companies (ethical behavior in interactions with public officials, politicians and other firms)?

Scores

Each question is scored by respondents on a scale of 1 - 7.
The results of parts a) to e) of the first question were aggregated into a single score. The results of the three questions were then averaged across all respondents to give a score per country/territory.

Country Coverage

In 2015 the survey captured the views of business executives in 134 economies. The survey is conducted in each country/territory according to the sampling guidelines and therefore in a consistent manner across the globe during the same time of year.

Data availability

The World Economic Forum has conducted its annual survey for more than 30 years. The data was gathered in a survey conducted between January and June 2015. Some aggregated data is available in the appendix of the Global Competitiveness Report, the micro-level data is provided to TI by the World Economic Forum.

http://www.weforum.org/

 

 

12. World Justice Project Rule of Law Index 2015

Code: WJP

Data Provider

The World Justice Project (WJP) is an independent, not-for-profit organisation working to advance the rule of law for the development of communities of opportunity and equity. The WJP’s multi-national, multi-disciplinary efforts are dedicated to developing practical programmes in support of the rule of law around the world. The work of the WJP is based on two complementary premises: the rule of law is the foundation for communities of opportunity and equity, and multi-disciplinary collaboration is the most effective way to advance the rule of law.

The WJP Rule of Law Index is an assessment tool designed by The World Justice Project to offer a detailed and comprehensive picture of the extent to which countries/territories adhere to the rule of law in practice. The Index provides detailed information and original data regarding a variety of dimensions of the rule of law, which enables stakeholders to assess a nation’s adherence to the rule of law in practice, identify a nation’s strengths and weaknesses in comparison to similarly situated countries, and track changes over time.

The Index’s rankings and scores are the product of a rigorous data collection and aggregation process. Data comes from a global poll of the general public and detailed questionnaires administered to local experts. To date, over 2,000 experts and 66,000 other individuals from around the world have participated in this project.

Corruption Question(s)

A total of 68 questions are asked of experts and respondents from the general population (53 and 15 targeted to each group respectively) on the extent to which government officials use public office for private gain. These questions touch on a variety of sectors within government including the public health system, regulatory agencies, the police, and the courts. Individual questions are aggregated into four sub-indices:

  • Government officials in the executive branch do not use public office for private gain
  • Government officials in the judicial branch do not use public office for private gain
  • Government officials in the police and the military do not use public office for private gain
  • Government officials in the legislature do not use public office for private gain


Only the scores provided by the experts were considered for the CPI calculations.

Scores

Scores are given on a continuous scale between from a low of 0 to a high of 1.

Country Coverage

102 countries were scored in the 2015 Rule of Law index.

The Index is deliberately intended to be applied in countries with vastly differing social, cultural, economic, and political systems.

Data availability

The first edition was published in 2010, with slight variation in methodology and country coverage.

Data for computing this index was collected between fall 2012 and fall autumn 2014. Data is publicly available online.

http://worldjusticeproject.org/rule-of-law-index/

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